Alex. M. 29. Gay. Trans. PTSD. Kitties. Miscellaneous.

houseofalexzander:

Don’t tell me that Gender Fluid is a lie.
Don’t tell me that Gender Fluid is just a phase.
Don’t tell me that Gender Fluid is childish.

I live and breath my gender fluidity. I proudly stand within the Gender Queers in support of a new, gender variant society.

Gender is the seed that has sprouted into the discriminatory, bigoted & bland society we live in. When you dig down deep into the issues surrounding the world right now it all comes back to one tiny little fuck up. The idea that biological sex somehow determines the gender roll of individuals is a lie. In fact, gender rolls is a lie. Just because I identify as gender fluid does not mean that I must uphold any societal expectation, associated with gender fluidity.

Plain and simple, I plan on having two children.
I will not teach my little boy to “be a man.”
I will not teach my little girl what it means to “be a woman.”
Instead, i’ll teach my children to just simply be good people.
Because a society full of good people makes for a better life than a society full of classified, judgmental, opinionated and shallow people.

Thank you,
Elliott Alexzander

This message brought to you by House of Alexzander

(via thegreatcontradiction)

pi-ratical:

I am really, extremely, amazingly excited to announce the release of my new Hello Pronoun stickers! I posted about these on twitter last night, but I can finally talk about them at length a bit more here. 

The stickers read “Hello, address me as:_________, Please use: ________”, allowing you to declare your name of choice and preferred pronouns immediately upon meeting people. These have been my pet project over the last week or two and a lot of thought has gone into their production. The colours were specifically chosen to be nongendered - no pink or baby blue (The Ze/Hir/Hirs looks a bit blue in these pictures but is really solidly teal), They rather specifically do not read “my name is” to head off people being dicks about “Is that REALLY your name?” because frankly it doesn’t matter if it is or not because it’s what you fucking go by. (Besides which, the concept of a true name is pretty bullshit unless you’re looking into demon summoning) I feel like there are a lot of great potential uses for these! They’d be great at school LGBT-club meetings or other large gatherings where you’re likely to meet a lot of new people, like conventions. They can be used right after coming out to help people who’ve known you for a while adapt to your new name/pronouns. If you’re genderfluid, you can use them to declare your preference on any particular day (and I’m looking into some more permanent buttons that’d make this much easier). They can even be used to remind that one old friend who can never get your damn pronouns right. Overall, it seems like these’ll be a wonderfully useful thing for folks under the trans* umbrella to have around and I’m really happy to have made them.

Obviously I couldn’t cover every pronoun variation/combination, particularly on the first run of stickers, but I tried to cover my bases on common nongendered/third gender pronouns. I’m completely open to taking requests for additional stickers, though, and if I get enough requests for a particular pronoun set I’ll be glad to maker a sticker for it.

I’ll have these with me at SacAnime this weekend for 1/$0.50, 5/$2, and 10/$3. They’re currently available on my Storenvy at 5/$2 - I’ll be adding 10/$3 after the con, at the moment I just want to make sure I don’t run out as I’ve only printed up 160 of each design.

(via sphygmic)

A great many people familiar with the trans* community may have heard of hijras, a concept of gender that exists within South Asia. A great many usually white trans* people have called hijra’s “trans*” or put them under the trans* label. Regardless of their intention, to take the epistemology of “trans*” and apply it to something like the hijra can be seen as an oppressive or colonising act. The hijra are hijra. That is their name. Unless a hijra specifically identifies as transgender or trans*, applying our own concepts of gender and sexuality constructed within white supremacist cultures to people outside of our epistemological framework is redefining them on our own terms for our own benefit. Another instance of where this occurs is within the American/Canadian indigenous or native concept of two spirit, which is in and of itself an umbrella term for multiple tribal concepts of third or mixed gender roles. The definition not only differs from tribe to tribe, but in many cases applying the white concept of gender toward two spirit people, again, becomes an act of oppression and colonisation. Especially when, without any indigenous or native background, white people adopt the identification mantle of “two spirit”.
A study on masculinity and aggression from the University of South Florida found that innocuous – yet feminine – tasks could produce profound anxiety in men. As part of the study, a group of men were asked to perform a stereotypically feminine act – braiding hair in this case - while a control group braided rope. Following the act, the men were given the option to either solve a puzzle or punch a heavy bag. Not surprisingly, the men who performed the task that threatened their masculinity were far more likely to punch the bag; again, violence serving as a way to reestablish their masculine identity. A follow-up had both groups punch the bag after braiding either hair or rope; the men who braided the hair punched the bag much harder. A third experiment, all the participants braided hair, but were split into two groups: those who got to punch the bag afterwards and those who didn’t. The men who were prevented from punching the bag started to show acute signs of anxiety and distress from not being able to reconfirm their masculinity.

—Doctor Nerdlove, "When Masculinity Fails Men" (via aldoushuxley)

(Source: sepiacircus, via oniyuri)

gordievoir:

Canadian artist JJ Levine’s photo series Alone Time is a project in which he transforms one model into two different genders. “By doubling a single body within one frame, I celebrate the human capacity for gender fluidity and call into question the idea of authenticity of gender.”

(via neutrois)